An argument for keeping repeat offenders in jail

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An argument for keeping repeat offenders in jail

Sex Offender Laws in the US September 11, End Registration of Juveniles, Residency Restrictions and Online Registries Acknowledgements Human Rights Watch would like to thank all of the survivors of sexual violence, former offenders and their families, social workers, advocates, law enforcement officials, and attorneys who shared their experiences and perspective with us for this report.

We are especially grateful to those who trusted us with very painful and personal stories. Corinne Carey, former researcher for the US Program, undertook the original research for this report. Ian Gorvin, deputy director of the Program Office, and Aisling Reidy, senior legal counsel, edited the report.

An argument for keeping repeat offenders in jail

Robert Prentky, and Dr. Levenson for providing guidance and insights in helping us to shape the research and writing of this report. Wetterling also reviewed the report. Human Rights Watch would also like to thank Peter B. Summary The reality is that sex offenders are a great political target, but that doesn't mean any law under the sun is appropriate.

There is no simple cure to the very complex problem of sexual violence. In February she was abducted from her home in Florida, raped, and buried alive by a stranger, a next-door neighbor who had been twice convicted of molesting children.

Over the past decade, several horrific crimes like Jessica's murder have captured massive media attention and fueled widespread fears that children are at high risk of assault by repeat sex offenders. Politicians have responded with a series of laws, including the sex offender registration, community notification, and residency restriction laws that are the subject of this report.

Federal law and the laws of all 50 states now require adults and some juveniles convicted of specified crimes that involve sexual conduct to register with law enforcement-regardless of whether the crimes involved children.

So-called "Megan's Laws" establish public access to registry information, primarily by mandating the creation of online registries that provide a former offender's criminal history, current photograph, current address, and other information such as place of employment.

An argument for keeping repeat offenders in jail

In many states everyone who is required to register is included on the online registry. A growing number of states and municipalities have also prohibited registered offenders from living within a designated distance typically to 2, feet of places where children gather-for example, schools, playgrounds, and daycare centers.

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Human Rights Watch appreciates the sense of concern and urgency that has prompted these laws. They reflect a deep public yearning for safety in a world that seems increasingly threatening. Every child has the right to live free from violence and sexual abuse.

Promoting public safety by holding offenders accountable and by instituting effective crime prevention measures is a core governmental obligation. Unfortunately, our research reveals that sex offender registration, community notification, and residency restriction laws are ill-considered, poorly crafted, and may cause more harm than good: The registration laws are overbroad in scope and overlong in duration, requiring people to register who pose no safety risk; Under community notification laws, anyone anywhere can access online sex offender registries for purposes that may have nothing to do with public safety.

Sex Offender Laws in the US | HRW

Harassment of and violence against registrants have been the predictable result; In many cases, residency restrictions have the effect of banishing registrants from entire urban areas and forcing them to live far from their homes and families.

The evidence is overwhelming, as detailed in this report, that these laws cause great harm to the people subject to them.Seven Things to Know About Repeat Offenders A new report looks at recidivism among inmates released from federal prisons.

But it’s worth keeping in mind that when members of Congress talk about federal sentencing reform, they are talking about a significantly less menacing population than the legion of monsters sometimes conjured . I’m curious if D.C.’s algorithm has been challenged under a disparate impact theory for recommending release more often for white people than black people – facially-similar algorithms have been challenged on such grounds in the past.

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How old is racial profiling? The Free Negro Registry was a means of identifying and tracking so-called Free Persons of Color. In colonial Virginia, all Free Persons of Color were required to show. A reader writes: I inadvertently found out while doing a search of local registered sex offenders in my area that a very friendly and polite older gentlemen who recently began to work at my company is a registered sex offender for possession of child pornography.

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