The education system in england

Many eminent people in many different areas whose work reached global recognition came out of British universities. Some of these universities and other higher education providers are ranked at the top among universities in the world.

The education system in england

Sincethere have been six main types of maintained state-funded school in England: Their start-up costs are typically funded by private means, such as entrepreneurs or NGOs, with running costs met by Central Government and, like Foundation schools, are administratively free from direct local authority control.

The Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government expanded the role of Academies in the Academy Programme, in which a wide number of schools in non-deprived areas were also encouraged to become Academies, thereby essentially replacing the role of Foundation schools established by the previous Labour government.

They are monitored directly by the Department for Education. Free schoolsintroduced by the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition following the general election, are newly established schools in England set up by parents, teachers, charities or businesses, where there is a perceived local need for more schools.

They are funded by taxpayers, are academically non-selective and free to attend, and like Foundation schools and Academies, are not controlled by a local authority. They are ultimately accountable to the Secretary of State for Education.

Free schools are an extension of the existing Academy Programme. The first 24 free schools opened in Autumn Foundation schoolsin which the governing body employs the staff and has primary responsibility for admissions. School land and buildings are owned by the governing body or by a charitable foundation.

The Foundation appoints a minority of governors. Many of these schools were formerly grant maintained schools. In the Labour government proposed allowing all schools to become Foundation schools if they wished. Voluntary Aided schoolslinked to a variety of organisations. They can be faith schools about two thirds Church of England -affiliated; just under one third Roman Catholic Churchand a few another faithor non-denominational schools, such as those linked to London Livery Companies.

The governing body employs the staff and has primary responsibility for admissions. However, the local authority employs the schools' staff and has primary responsibility for admissions. In addition, three of the fifteen City Technology Colleges established in the s still remain; the rest having converted to academies.

These are state-funded all-ability secondary schools which charge no fees but which are independent of local authority control.

There are also a small number of state-funded boarding schools. English state-funded primary schools are almost all local schools with a small catchment area. More than half are owned by the Local Authority, though many are nominally voluntary controlled and some are voluntary aided.

Some schools just include infants aged 4 to 7 and some just juniors aged 7 to Some are linked, with automatic progression from the infant school to the junior school, and some are not.

UK Education System Guide - Everything You Need to Know

A few areas still have first schools for ages around 4 to 8 and middle schools for ages 8 or 9 to 12 or An example of a Grammar School - in Sutton, London English secondary schools are mostly comprehensive i.

In a few areas children can enter a grammar school if they pass the eleven plus exam ; there are also a number of isolated fully selective grammar schools and a few dozen partially selective schools.

The education system in england

All state-funded schools are regularly inspected by the Office for Standards in Educationoften known simply as Ofsted. Ofsted publish reports on the quality of education at a particular school on a regular basis. Schools judged by Ofsted to be providing an inadequate standard of education may be subject to special measureswhich could include replacing the governing body and senior staff.

Some independent schools for 13—year-olds are known for historical reasons as ' public schools ' and for 8—year-olds as ' prep schools '.There are also significant divergences between practice in England and Wales, on the one hand, and in Scotland.

In England and Wales, the government introduced a National Curriculum in This provides a framework for education between the ages of 5 - All state schools are required to follow it.

Education in the United Kingdom is a devolved matter with each of the countries of the United Kingdom having separate systems under separate governments: the UK Government is responsible for England; whilst the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive are responsible for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, respectively.

In England, further education is often seen as forming one part of a wider learning and skills sector, alongside workplace education, prison education, and other types of non-school, non-university education and training.

The education system in the UK is divided into four main parts, primary education, secondary education, further education and higher education.

Children in the UK have to legally attend primary and secondary education which runs from about 5 years old until the student is 16 years old. There are also significant divergences between practice in England and Wales, on the one hand, and in Scotland.

Education in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

In England and Wales, the government introduced a National Curriculum in This provides a framework for education between the ages of 5 - All state schools are required to follow it. Education in England is overseen by the United Kingdom's Department for Education. Local government authorities are responsible for implementing policy for public education and state-funded schools at a .

The British Education System - British Culture, Customs and Traditions